Holladay

Holladay is a city in Salt Lake County, Utah, United States spelled a bit differently than 'holiday'. The population was 14,561 at the 2000 census. The city was incorporated on November 29, 1999 as Holladay-Cottonwood, and the name was shortened to Holladay on December 14 of that year. It was reported in the 1990 Census as the Holladay-Cottonwood CDP. According to Wikipedia, on July 29, 1847 a group of pioneers (members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) known as the Mississippi Company, among them John Holladay of Alabama, entered the Salt Lake Valley. Within weeks after their arrival, they discovered a free-flowing, spring-fed stream, which they called Spring Creek (near what is now Kentucky Avenue). While most of the group returned to the main settlement in Great Salt Lake for the winter, two or three men built dugouts along this stream and wintered over. Thus, this became the first village established away from Great Salt Lake City itself. In the spring, a number of families hurried out to build homes and tame the land. There were numerous springs and ponds here and grasses and wild flowers were abundant, making this a most desirable area for settlement.  When John Holladay was named as the branch president of the Church, the village took upon itself the name of Holladay’s Settlement or Holladay’s Burgh. John Holladay's family dates to the early 1700s in Virginia. His ancestors were signers of the South Carolina Declaration of Independence and fought in the Revolutionary War. He is a cousin to Ben Holladay, The Stagecoach King, who traded with the LDS and ran his Denver-San Francisco stage line through Salt Lake. It is not known if they were in contact. John and his father Daniel, a Revolutionary War veteran, pioneered in Alabama before John's conversion to Mormonism. A year before the first LDS migration, in the spring of 1846, he departed west with his extended family joining other converts that made up the Mississippi Company led by John Brown. They had been led to expect to meet the main party on the trail but after going as far as Laramie without a sign of them they went south and wintered at Pueblo, Colorado where they were later joined by the Mormon Battalion sick detachments. They had not gotten the word that Brigham Young's departure had been delayed by a year.

Holladay is actually the oldest continuously inhabited settlement in Utah, since Salt Lake City was abandoned for a time in 1857 when Johnston's Army occupied the city.  Cottonwood, a nearby settlement, was always associated with "Holladay's Burgh," and the area was first designated "Big Cottonwood," and later, as one of Salt Lake County's unincorporated communities, as "Holladay-Cottonwood".  Another center of settlement is the area settled in the mid-1800s by Rasmus Knudsen, now known as Knudsen's Corner. This area lies in the extreme southeastern corner of the city and is split with neighboring Cottonwood Heights. An 18 hole golf course was added in the last decade above Knudsen's Corner, now called 'the Old Mill'-with sweeping 360 views of the valley and mountains.

In the 1960s the Cottonwood Mall was constructed in Holladay, it being Utah's first enclosed shopping mall. The mall was closed down in 2007 after an ambitious plan to turn the mall into a European-style outdoor shopping village was announced. That company folded in the crash and the land sits vacant except for a Macy's department store.  The city was incorporated on November 29, 1999 as Holladay-Cottonwood, and the name was shortened to Holladay on December 14 of that year.  It has also expanded its borders several times, the most significant expansion of which was in 2002.[1]  Homes in Holladay can start in the high $200,000’s and go into the millions of dollars. It is one of the more expensive places to live within the Salt Lake Valley.  The best locally made garlic burgers can be found at a little beer bar in the area called 'the Cottonbottom' -one of Utah's better dives!